Paediatric Ophthalmology

Pediatric ophthalmology is a sub-speciality of ophthalmology concerned with eye diseases, visual development, and vision care in children. Wockhardt Hospital’s Pediatric ophthalmologists focus on the development of the visual system and the various diseases that disrupt visual development in children. We also have expertise in managing the various ocular diseases that affect children.  Doctors are qualified to perform complex eye surgery as well as to manage children's eye problems using glasses and medications.

Pediatric ophthalmologists are specially trained to manage the following disorders:

  • Infections (Conjunctivitis).
  • Strabismus is a misalignment of the eyes that affects 2-4% of the population; it is often associated with amblyopia. The inward turning gaze commonly referred to as "crossed-eyes" is an example of strabismus. The term strabismus applies to other types of misalignments, including an upward, downward, or outward turning eye.
  • Amblyopia (aka lazy eye) occurs when the vision of one eye is significantly better than the other eye, and the brain begins to rely on the better eye and ignore the weaker one. Blocked tear ducts.
  • Ptosis
  • Retinopathy of prematurity
  • Nystagmus
  • Visual inattention
  • Pediatric cataracts
  • Pediatric glaucoma
  • Abnormal vision development
  • Genetic disorders often cause eye problems for affected children. Since approximately 30% of genetic syndromes affect the eyes, examination by a pediatric ophthalmologist can help with the diagnosis of genetic conditions. Many pediatric ophthalmologists participate with multi-disciplinary medical teams that treat children with genetic syndromes.
  • Congenital malformations affecting vision or the tear drainage duct system can be evaluated and possibly surgically corrected by a pediatric ophthalmologist.
  • Orbital tumours
  • Refractive errors such as myopia (near-sightedness), hyperopia (far-sightedness) and astigmatism can often be corrected with prescriptions for glasses or contacts.
  • Accommodative insufficiency
  • Convergence insufficiency and asthenopia

FAQs

How can a child be tested for glasses in early childhood?

An ophthalmologist can detect the need for glasses through a complete eye exam. Typically, the pupils are dilated in order to relax the focusing muscles, so that an accurate measurement can be obtained. By using a special instrument, called a retinoscope, our eye doctor can arrive at an accurate prescription. The ophthalmologist will then advise parents whether there is a need for glasses, or whether the condition can be monitored.

What should be done if a child has an eye injury?

If there is a chemical injury or chemical reaction, you need immediately flush the eyes and face of your child with any available source of water for at least 10-15 minutes. If the irritation continues, child needs to be consulted with doctor immediately.

If a sharp object has penetrated the eye (like a fish hook), do not pull it out, but transport the person to the emergency room as soon as possible. Other blunt or sharp injuries should be examined by an ophthalmologist, since the serious nature of the injury may not be readily apparent.

Why does a child need glasses?

Children may need glasses for several reasons—some of which are different than for adults. Because a child’s vision system is growing and developing, especially during the first 5-6 years of life, glasses may play an important role in insuring normal vision development.

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