Liver Cirrhosis Treatment

The liver plays a vital role in synthesis of proteins, detoxification, and storage. It participates in the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates. When the tissues of the liver are damaged due to formation of scars, lumps, fibrosis resulting in the complete loss of liver functions it is known as Cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is an advanced liver disease and in most cases commonly caused by alcoholism, hepatitis B and hepatitis C, and fatty liver disease, but has many other possible known and unknown causes. Cirrhosis has many possible manifestations such as “yellowishness”, fluid retention in the abdominal cavity (ascites), secondary hypertension etc. The potentially life-threatening complications include hepatic encephalopathy (confusion and coma) and bleeding from esophageal varices. At this stage, cirrhosis is irreversible, and treatment usually focuses on preventing progression and complications. In advanced stages the only treatment option is a liver transplant.

Advantages: Screening of liver function regularly can help to diagnose possible liver failure. Ultrasonography is a simple method to diagnose any structural changes of the liver. In the initial stages, the preventive strategies can help reverse the failing liver.

FAQs:

How is cirrhosis diagnosed?

Cirrhosis is diagnosed based on the clinical, laboratory, and radiologic (ultrasound) findings. Alternatively, a liver biopsy can also be confirmed.

How can cirrhosis be prevented?

Key prevention strategies for cirrhosis and its compensation are population-wide interventions to reduce alcohol intake (through pricing strategies, public health campaigns and personal counseling), programs to reduce the transmission of viral hepatitis, and screening of relatives of people with hereditary liver diseases. Little is known on modulators of cirrhosis risk and progression.

Is cirrhosis of liver reversible?

Generally, liver damage from cirrhosis cannot be reversed, but treatment could stop or delay further progression and reduce complications.

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