Endoscopic Spine Surgery

Endoscopic Spine Surgery is a type of state-of-the-art surgery that uses small tubular system or micro incisions, assisted with an endoscope or microscope. This type of surgery provides patients with quicker recovery and less pain than traditional spine surgery. It preserves normal spine mobility because the spine is not fused with screws and rods. With experienced hands, most of procedures take less than one hour and the patient gets back to walk around in only a few hours. Some of the spinal conditions treated with this technique are degenerative disc disease, herniated discs, Scoliosis and spinal stenosis. It is a less risky, less invasive option compared to traditional open spine surgery. Although the goals of this surgery are the same as open traditional procedures.

Advantages: Endoscopic spine surgery is an attractive option for patients with quicker recovery after surgery, less post-operative pain, and smaller incisions and minimal soft tissue damage. It also leaves no scars and has cosmetic appeal.

FAQs

How long will the patient be in the hospital?

In general, minimally invasive spine surgery decreases the hospital stay by one-half. In a typical endoscopic spine surgery it is performed in the same day, and the patients go home shortly after surgery. Furthermore, the immediate post-operative period is marked by much less pain when using minimally invasive techniques on the same day.

How long is the recovery?

Recovery from each surgery is different. Some patients return to full activity in 6 weeks while other patients require more time.

Does taking pain relieving medication lead to addiction following this procedure?

There is no evidence that post-operation pain treatment leads to addiction. This procedure is not very painful and moderate painkillers are sufficient to relieve pain.

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